Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.ucc.edu.co/handle/20.500.12494/41844
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dc.creatorHernández C.-
dc.creatorSalazar C.-
dc.creatorBrochero H.-
dc.creatorTeherán A.-
dc.creatorBuitrago L.S.-
dc.creatorVera M.-
dc.creatorSoto H.-
dc.creatorFlorez-Rivadeneira Z.-
dc.creatorArdila S.-
dc.creatorParra Henao, Gabriel Jaime-
dc.creatorRamírez J.D.-
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-16T22:15:50Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-16T22:15:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.17013/risti.19.15-31-
dc.identifierhttps://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/cpaz/article/view/11695/12853-
dc.identifier.issn17563305es
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12494/41844-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Due to its genetic diversity has been classified into six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) in association with transmission cycles. In Colombia, natural T. cruzi infection has been detected in 15 triatomine species. There is scarce information regarding the infection rates, DTUs and feeding preferences of secondary vectors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine T. cruzi infection rates, parasite DTU, ecotopes, insect stages, geographical location and bug feeding preferences across six different triatomine species. Methods: A total of 245 insects were collected in seven departments of Colombia. We conducted molecular detection and genotyping of T. cruzi with subsequent identification of food sources. The frequency of infection, DTUs, TcI genotypes and feeding sources were plotted across the six species studied. A logistic regression model risk was estimated with insects positive for T. cruzi according to demographic and eco-epidemiological characteristics. Results: We collected 85 specimens of Panstrongylus geniculatus, 77 Rhodnius prolixus, 37 R. pallescens, 34 Triatoma maculata, 8 R. pictipes and 4 T. dimidiata. The overall T. cruzi infection rate was 61.2% and presented statistical associations with the departments Meta (OR: 2.65; 95% CI: 1.69-4.17) and Guajira (OR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.16-3.94); peridomestic ecotope (OR: 2.52: 95% CI: 1.62-3.93); the vector species P. geniculatus (OR: 2.40; 95% CI: 1.51-3.82) and T. maculata (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.02-4.29); females (OR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.39-3.04) and feeding on opossum (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.85-11.69) and human blood (OR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.07-2.24). Regarding the DTUs, we observed TcI (67.3%), TcII (6.7%), TcIII (8.7%), TcIV (4.0%) and TcV (6.0%). Across the samples typed as TcI, we detected TcIDom (19%) and sylvatic TcI (75%). The frequencies of feeding sources were 59.4% (human blood); 11.2% (hen); 9.6% (bat); 5.6% (opossum); 5.1% (mouse); 4.1% (dog); 3.0% (rodent); 1.0% (armadillo); and 1.0% (cow). Conclusions: New scenarios of T. cruzi transmission caused by secondary and sylvatic vectors are considered. The findings of sylvatic DTUs from bugs collected in domestic and peridomestic ecotopes confirms the emerging transmission scenarios in Colombia. © 2016 The Author(s).es
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2021-12-16T22:15:50Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2016en
dc.format.extent620-620es
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.es
dc.relation.ispartofPARASITE VECTORes
dc.subjectArticlees
dc.subjectChagas diseasees
dc.subjectColombiaes
dc.subjectcontrolled studyes
dc.subjectdisease transmissiones
dc.subjectfeeding behaviores
dc.subjectfemalees
dc.subjectgenetic variabilityes
dc.subjectgenotypees
dc.subjecthost parasite interactiones
dc.subjecthumanes
dc.subjectlimit of quantitationes
dc.subjectmalees
dc.subjectnonhumanes
dc.subjectPanstrongyluses
dc.subjectPanstrongylus geniculatuses
dc.subjectRhodniuses
dc.subjectRhodnius pallescenses
dc.subjectRhodnius pictipeses
dc.subjectRhodnius prolixuses
dc.subjectTriatomaes
dc.subjectTriatoma dimidiataes
dc.subjectTriatoma maculataes
dc.subjectTrypanosoma cruzies
dc.subjectanimales
dc.subjectChagas diseasees
dc.subjectclassificationes
dc.subjectdisease carrieres
dc.subjectdisease transmissiones
dc.subjectgeneticses
dc.subjectisolation and purificationes
dc.subjectparasitologyes
dc.subjectprevalencees
dc.subjecttransmissiones
dc.subjectTriatominaees
dc.subjectAnimalses
dc.subjectChagas Diseasees
dc.subjectColombiaes
dc.subjectDisease Transmissiones
dc.subjectInfectiouses
dc.subjectDisease Vectorses
dc.subjectGenotypees
dc.subjectHumanses
dc.subjectPrevalencees
dc.subjectTriatominaees
dc.subjectTrypanosoma cruzies
dc.titleUntangling the transmission dynamics of primary and secondary vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in Colombia: Parasite infection, feeding sources and discrete typing unitses
dc.typeArtículo-
dc.creator.mailgabriel.parrah@ucc.edu.coes
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHernández C,Salazar C,Brochero H,Teherán A,Buitrago LS,Vera M,Soto H,Florez Z,Ardila S,Parra G,Ramírez JD. Untangling the transmission dynamics of primary and secondary vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in Colombia: Parasite infection, feeding sources and discrete typing units. Parasit Vectors. 2016. 9. (1):p. 620-620. .es
dc.rights.accessRightsDesconocidoes
dc.description.orcid0000-0003-4535-6521es
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