Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12494/15978
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Title: NK Cells in HIV-1 Infection: From Basic Science to Vaccine Strategies
Author: Zapata, Wildeman
Hernandez Lopez, Juan Carlos
Lizdany, Florez
Email autor: wildeman.zapatab@campusucc.edu.co
metadata.dc.description.cvlac: https://scienti.minciencias.gov.co/cvlac/EnProdArticulo/query.do?cod_producto=73&cod_rh=0000157775
Issue Date: 17-Oct-2018
Keywords: natural killer cells
HIV-1
HIV resistance
HIV vaccine
Memory NK cells
Resume: NK cells play a key role in immune response against HIV infection. These cells can destroy infected cells and contribute to adequate and strong adaptive immune responses, by acting on dendritic, T, B, and even epithelial cells. Increased NK cell activity reflected by higher cytotoxic capacity, IFN-g and chemokines (CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5) production, has been associated with resistance to HIV infection and delayed AIDS progression, demonstrating the importance of these cells in the antiviral response. Recently, a subpopulation of NK cells with adaptive characteristics has been described and associated with lower HIV viremia and control of infection. These evidences, together with some degree of protection shown in vaccine trials based on boosting NK cell activity, suggest that these cells can be a feasible option for new treatment and vaccination strategies to overcome limitations that, classical vaccination approaches, might have for this virus. This review is focus on the NK cells role during the immune response against HIV, including all the effector mechanisms associated to these cells; in addition, changes including phenotypic, functional and frequency modifications during HIV infection will be pointed, highlighting opportunities to vaccine development based in NK cells effector functions.
Abstract: NK cells play a key role in immune response against HIV infection. These cells can destroy infected cells and contribute to adequate and strong adaptive immune responses, by acting on dendritic, T, B, and even epithelial cells. Increased NK cell activity reflected by higher cytotoxic capacity, IFN-g and chemokines (CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5) production, has been associated with resistance to HIV infection and delayed AIDS progression, demonstrating the importance of these cells in the antiviral response. Recently, a subpopulation of NK cells with adaptive characteristics has been described and associated with lower HIV viremia and control of infection. These evidences, together with some degree of protection shown in vaccine trials based on boosting NK cell activity, suggest that these cells can be a feasible option for new treatment and vaccination strategies to overcome limitations that, classical vaccination approaches, might have for this virus. This review is focus on the NK cells role during the immune response against HIV, including all the effector mechanisms associated to these cells; in addition, changes including phenotypic, functional and frequency modifications during HIV infection will be pointed, highlighting opportunities to vaccine development based in NK cells effector functions.
Program: Medicina
Headquarters: Medellín
Type: Artículo
Citation: Flórez-Álvarez L, Hernandez JC and Zapata W (2018) NK Cells in HIV-1 Infection: From Basic Science to Vaccine Strategies. Front. Immunol. 9:2290. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.02290
Resource reference: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02290/full
Appears in Collections:Medicina

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